archaeologicalnews

archaeologicalnews:

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Ancient stone artifacts recently excavated from Saudi Arabia possess similarities to items of about the same age in Africa — a discovery that could provide clues to how humans dispersed out of Africa, researchers say.

Modern humans originated about 200,000 years ago in Africa. However,…

archaeologicalnews

archaeologicalnews:

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The mysterious Kennewick Man, who died 9,000 years ago in the Columbia River Valley, was a seal hunter who rambled far and wide with a projectile point lodged in his hip, five broken ribs that never healed properly, two small dents in his skull and a bum shoulder from the repetitive stress of…

archaeologicalnews

archaeologicalnews:

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Archaeologists have discovered an ancient settlement on the bank of the Ishim River in Akmola oblast, Tengrinews reports citing the Oblast Department of Culture.

The settlement of Kursk is located on the right bank and covers the area of 45 thousand square meters. It dates back to the Middle…

archaeologicalnews

archaeologicalnews:

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Archaeologists working at the ancient city of Corinth, Greece, have discovered a tomb dating back around 2,800 years that has pottery decorated with zigzagging designs.

The tomb was built sometime between 800 B.C. and 760 B.C., a time when Corinth was emerging as a major power and Greeks were…

archaeologicalnews

archaeologicalnews:

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Neanderthals went extinct in Europe about 40,000 years ago, giving them millennia to coexist with modern humans culturally and sexually, new findings suggest.

This research also suggests that modern humans did not cause Neanderthals to rapidly go extinct, as some researchers have previously…

archaeologicalnews

archaeologicalnews:

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Paleolithic inhabitants of modern-day Spain may have eaten snails 10,000 years earlier than their Mediterranean neighbors, according to a study published August 20, 2014 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Javier Fernández-López de Pablo from Institut Català de Paleoecologia Humana i…

Yum?

archaeologicalnews

archaeologicalnews:

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Two sphinxes weighing around 1.5 tons each will not be moved from the entrance to the tomb at Ancient Amphipolis currently being excavated by archaeologists.

It has also been decided that a mosaic displaying black and white rhombus shapes will not be moved either, Kathimerini has been told.

Technical work began on Monday at the tomb in Central Macedonia, northern Greece, to ensure there will be no collapse or other damage as archaeologists attempt to enter the tomb and discover what lies inside.